Business · Career · Lifestyle

Listening to the inner voice

Imagine the following scenario:
You lost your way while driving. You know you are lost because you have been driving forever and didn’t reach your destination. You do what all drivers do. You slow down, turn the radio off and if you have company, you shush them. You try to eliminate as much distraction as possible, so you can think clearly. But, sometimes slowing down doesn’t help. So, you stop to scout the area and collect your thoughts. When you stop you might look at a map, ask people for directions or think about what you should do next.

Unfortunately, slowing down, clearing your thoughts and even asking for help doesn’t work all the time. What if you reached an intersection and passersby give you different directions to your destination? Who would you listen to? What would you do then? You did everything you can do. You slowed down, you stopped to think and you asked for help. Alas, nothing helped and you still don’t know what road to take.

So, what do you do?

The multiple directions to the same destination might all be right. But definitely not all directions may fit you. Our journey in life has no ‘detailed’ road maps or manuals. A friend once lamented, after his divorce, that there is no manual for marriage. He complained that we are left on our own to figure out the most essential thing in life; making a family. Maybe, the reason there are no manuals or road maps, for our growth, is because what works for one doesn’t necessarily work for others.

Before taking a critical decision, whether it is changing a career or moving to a different city or getting a divorce, we think a lot about the consequences of our decision. When we are at lost we seek guidance. We ask around. We study and do our research about all the hypotheses related to our decision. Some people also solicit an answer by praying.

So, what do you do when your quest to find an answer fails? What do you do when you need to take a decisive decision but you simply have no clue what to do?

You take a chance. You listen to what your gut tells you. It is called instinct. Animals’ lives depend on it. Humans, unfortunately, rarely follow their instinct. Although, I believe, human’s instinct is more powerful than our logical sense.

If you feel the urge you need to take a particular decision, go for it. It is your trustworthy instinct taking over your brain. Listen and follow your inner voice!

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14 thoughts on “Listening to the inner voice

  1. A reflective time is crucial. So, allotment of such time is needed.
    I agree to what u said Malik but I am also aware of the risks (real OR perceived) of following your guts. I am totally for “it” though and I am certain it is worthwhile. But I keep hearing stories from people who are afraid to do so because, well, it is not always a happy ending. I do not mind not reaching a happy ending, Doesn’t mean one/I need to be reckless but it is just I can understand from where the other, majority-bounded I’d say, point of view is coming from.

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    1. I don’t think there is no such thing as a happy ending. There is no worse reality than the fact that we are going to die.
      I, for example, don’t judge movies by its ending. If I am entertained while watching the movie then I consider it a good movie even if I didn’t like its ending.
      Most of us are not happy because we are always waiting for something to happen. We associate our happiness with the achievement of something and we forget to enjoy ourselves during the journey.

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  2. Taking chances can oftentimes bring about great experiences that our brains would have logically talked us out of. Good luck in whatever instincts you are following these days. 🙂

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      1. Two months already?! Wow! I’m glad we can stay in touch on Facebook and now here on your blog again. 🙂

        Eager to see where you go next! And, hooray for following instincts!

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  3. Double doggie doo. I just typed out a long (but not too long) response and it disappeared. 😦 I wrote that I was like Haitham because I always hear about people taking big chances, but I’m afraid to do the same since the outcome might not turn out well for me and then I would have one more thing to stress out about.

    I agree with you about the reality of dying. It’s depressing when you hear about people who die far too young, who should really be here to enjoy life. A man in my neighborhood, who I had seen around for years, died recently and I never even knew he was sick. He would have been 37 this month and he was a really nice person, with a wife and children. The fact that we’re alive should push us to do the things that we really want to do since we never know when our time will be up.

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    1. I am sorry you had to rewrite your comment. If it is any consolation it happens to me quite often, especially when I write a long comment 🙂
      Thanks for sharing your thoughts on the subject.
      In my case, I know far too many unhappy men. Although the state of being happy is ideal but these people are sad most of the time, If not always. So, I decided to take a break and think carefully about my future. So far I can’t say things are better but at least I am happy with my decision.

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